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 Object Design Studio

290 Fillmore St, Denver, CO 80206

303-377-1701

Name
Name

290 Fillmore Street
Denver, CO 80206
USA

(303)377-1701

                                     Object Design Studio

Considered one of the best, living, custom jewelers, Nelson Giesecke has been creating fine jewelry in the Cherry Creek area of Denver for forty years. Each piece is custom designed in gold, silver, platinum, steel or palladium.
The world’s best diamonds and gemstones are available to the discerning
customer who wishes to help create a truly one of a kind piece.
If you are looking for the best custom jewelry in Denver with a flair for the well engineered and mechanical; or if you are looking for a truly unique wedding or engagement ring, Then Object Design studio should be your destination.

 

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Banging on Metal!

Creating and building high end, one of a kind jewelry and wrist watches. The process and concepts of each stage development. Kenitic art. Philosophy of art.

 

Hand-built wrist watch

Nelson Giesecke

Here are a few more images of the latest watch!!

Face with clouds and hand made hands

Face with clouds and hand made hands

Ft. Meyers seascape.

Ft. Meyers seascape.

Back of watch with egret emerging on rotor.

Back of watch with egret emerging on rotor.

renderings clouds

Nelson Giesecke

planned watch dial for the new watch.

planned watch dial for the new watch.

So now it is time to render clouds for the dial of a hand made watch. The waves are made. The sky is made. But the clouds. How do you make clouds?

Japanese sword furniture. The best inspiration!!

Japanese sword furniture. The best inspiration!!

Really? Can you believe the detail in this metalwork!? Everything is miniature, perfect and individually inlaid!

Really? Can you believe the detail in this metalwork!? Everything is miniature, perfect and individually inlaid!

The best I could do in 1985. This is all fused welded and marbleized Still think I can do better. The Mona Lisa with Mt. Fuji expresses a western view of Hokusai famous series of "Views of Mt Fuji."

The best I could do in 1985. This is all fused welded and marbleized Still think I can do better. The Mona Lisa with Mt. Fuji expresses a western view of Hokusai famous series of "Views of Mt Fuji."

This new dial is to be a bas-relief. The ocean should look very photographic, while the sky will be more abstract. I am working on it now. I guess you will have to wait for the results

More Movement

Nelson Giesecke

Movement is magic, so these are a few more favorites:

 Royal de Luxe create amazing events all over the world with their giant, mechanical puppets. As they state on their website,  "this is a company of inventors, stuntmen, poets and scrap-dealers all at once, led by Jean-Luc Courcoult. Royal de Luxe are currently considered to be an iconic, almost mythical, street theater company." They truly bring magic to life!

Theo Jensen creates wind driven "Strandbeests," sculptural life forms that walk on the beach.

To celebrate their 275th anniversary, Jaquet Droz created a limited number of wrist watches with singing birds. Even though the company is now owned by Swatch Group, it has a wonderful history and some very interesting time pieces. This is one of my favorites.

Movement in Art

Nelson Giesecke

To me, art comes alive when it moves. Maybe it started with a very early fascination for wind-up toys, but there is nothing more magic than seeing a crazy machine spin and twirl with life. Consequently, nothing was more epic to me than to see my first Jean Tinguey in Stockholm when I started studying there in the late 1960's, early 1970's.

He was a Swiss artist that reacted to the structured social confines of Swiss society by creating chaotic machines out of junk, old motors and found parts. It was brilliant! He even made the cover of Time Magazine when almost burned down MOMA in New York with a self destructive, mechanical sculpture when a burning, baby carriage got loose.

Huereka, Zurich, Switzerland

Huereka, Zurich, Switzerland

Fasnachts-Brunnen, Basel Switzerland

Fasnachts-Brunnen, Basel Switzerland

I want to paint!

Nelson Giesecke

Platinum silver, pure gold, dark white gold, platinum, 22 karat gold, green gold and Shakudo

Platinum silver, pure gold, dark white gold, platinum, 22 karat gold, green gold and Shakudo

 landscape paintings have always been a favorite form of art for me, so it has been natural for me to translate the idea of the"day" into metal. Rendering color is always the problem. The color palette is limited and the process is arduous at best.  However, over the years I have made various attempts at trying to "paint" with metal. Normally high fusion is the method I use to bond different alloys of gold and platinum to create different portraits, Below you will find a portrait of Mona Lisa with Mt. Fuji in the background. East meets West in Art!

Abstracted Mona Lisa with Mt. Fuji. Wrist watch back 1985.

Abstracted Mona Lisa with Mt. Fuji. Wrist watch back 1985.



SWATCH Group Changes the Creation of Time

Nelson Giesecke

In 1983 the Swatch watch was introduced to the world market. It was an instant success with many different versions and brilliant colors. However, behind this breakthrough product was a much bigger endeavor designed to re-invigorate Switzerland's struggling watch industry.

We all forget how important mechanical timepieces were a century ago as we glance at the time on our smart phones today. A century ago there was no digital, virtual or "cyber-real" time. All of the watches were mechanical. Switzerland was the undisputed leader of watchmaking at hat moment in history. However, increasing competition from Japanese manufacturing beginning in the 1930s, put the Swiss watch industry under severe economic stress. It wouldn't be until the early 1980s that the entrepreneur, Nicolas Hayek, would develop a strategy to consolidate all of the diverse, Swiss watchmaking industries under a new umbrella organization:  Swatch Group. The Swatch watch became the emblem of this new revitalization.

Since 1983 Swiss watch companies have become increasingly controlled by the Swatch Group to manufacture and provide parts exclusively to Swiss manufacturers. I was making my first hand built watch during those years, so didn't realize what those changes would mean going forward. 

In the 1980's it was easier to order movements and parts from Switzerland. Now it is much harder. Ironically, this vertical consolidation of the Swiss watch industry may have had a positive effect on my thinking. Technically complex, highly water resistant cases have always been an integral part of watchmaking for Object Design Studio. Today there is a greater challenge to innovate new solutions for designing. It has meant rethinking every aspect of the watch design, including creating new, hand built watch dials.     Read:  The Ocean on this blog for more.

The ocean

Nelson Giesecke

Long before I became a goldsmith I fantasized how to make art that captured the "day." How do you make a thing that could make you feel the "moment," feel the breeze or sense the warmth of the sun on a certain afternoon? So you can see that some of the pieces I have made in metal reflect that quest.

Gold Landscape and seascape with footprint and diamond sky.

Gold Landscape and seascape with footprint and diamond sky.

The movement of the ocean has always been fascinating. The force of the tides, reflected side currents and the direction of the wind creates motion in water. This motion becomes more and more amplified as the waves finally crash against the beach in a beautiful ballet of chaos,  rhythm and sound. To portray this experience in metal as a static bas-relief  becomes a particular challenge; especially when it cannot be thicker than a piece of paper for a watch dial!

transparent wax relief.

transparent wax relief.

It has taken two weeks and constant experimenting with new tools and techniques to render these waves in perspective. It will take another two or three weeks to render the sky and carefully smooth and burnish each wave. To be continued!